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Old 08-06-2012, 07:58 AM   #21
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Joined: Apr 2011
From: Port Orchard, WA

I Ride: 2007 Moto Guzzi Norge, 1988 H-D (Project) Electra-Glide
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffW View Post
Then, there are riders like this!

Going across Montana one day I had a giant bug wash around the windshield of my FLH and nail me in the ear. (No full face helmet, ATGATTers )

That hurt enough. Imagine if a bug does that and hits a much more sensitive spot.

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Old 08-06-2012, 08:07 AM   #22
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Joined: May 2012
From: Prineville or

I Ride: Cbr 1000rr
I worked between Pullman and Moscow last year on two different jobs. Rented an apt in Moscow. I liked being able to put around town with no helmet.
Usually wore it though and if I was going for any sort of ride other than to the quick stop or whatever I wore it always.

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Old 08-06-2012, 09:33 AM   #23
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Joined: Apr 2011
From: Portland

I Ride: Yamaha Warrior
I support your right to not wear a helmet where allowed. I hope you will support my right to laugh at your dead ass.

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Old 08-06-2012, 10:18 AM   #24
Mr. Pickles
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Joined: May 2005
From: Spokane

I Ride: 2012 Ultra Blue Metallic Wing w Rockin' Tunes...
Personal choice in states with a no helmet law; not my choice, but a choice none the less.

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Old 08-06-2012, 10:39 AM   #25
Bat Crazed
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Joined: May 2009
From: WA
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffW View Post
Then, there are riders like this!

Rep sent; That dude is my hero...AJ


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Old 08-06-2012, 03:01 PM   #26
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Joined: Jan 2010
From: Clarkston, WA

I Ride: It started out as a Bonneville...
Heh. Yeah, if you think Idaho's bad with the helmetless, wait until you get to Montana. I've gone over Lolo Pass twice this year and about the only people I saw with helmets over there besides me were guys on ADV bikes. And once in Missoula, I saw a guy on a Gixxer doing a helmetless squid-gear wheelie right beside (same lane) his buddy and girlfriend on a cruiser.

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Old 08-06-2012, 03:53 PM   #27
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Joined: Feb 2008
From: YooGene, OR

I Ride: Anything I can get my hands on.
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by mfrankpdx View Post
No. Being smart causes you to wear a helmet. See the difference there?
^^this.

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Old 08-06-2012, 03:54 PM   #28
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Joined: Jul 2009
From: Tacoma, Wa

I Ride: the Lightning
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by Tromatic View Post
I support your right to not wear a helmet where allowed. I hope you will support my right to laugh at your dead ass.

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Old 08-06-2012, 09:45 PM   #29
Chicken Strips
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Joined: Jun 2011
From: Lakewood, WA

I Ride: Suzuki GSXR 600, 2003 Honda CBR F4i
I guess riders figure if they are going to crash, they would rather be dead than having to survive a crash. I wonder what the survival rate is with no helmet?

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Old 08-07-2012, 04:54 AM   #30
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Joined: Feb 2011
From: dundee , oregon

I Ride: 1998 harley sportster custom
42 years riding , mostly without a helmut. Crossed country 3 times without one, back in the 70's lots of states didnt have them. Dont know why everyone gets so scared over it. You go as fast as comfort allows , without a helmut and no wind shield you go slow which = safer.

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Old 08-07-2012, 06:43 AM   #31
Chicken Strips
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Joined: May 2007
From: Spokane

I Ride: GSX1300R
IT'S ALL REALLY TIT FOR TAT.. BUT DID YOU NOTICE THE TITLE SAYS "IDAHO NO HELMET LAW". I'M NOT THE SMARTEST TOOL IN THE SHED, BUT I DIDN'T KNOW THEY HAD A LAW TELLING YOU THAT YOU COULDN'T WEAR ONE.

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Old 08-07-2012, 07:09 AM   #32
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Joined: Jul 2008
From: Cornelius, Oregon

I Ride: Everyday
I say the less the government is involved in anyones business the better off we are. If one wants to ride legally without a helmet in a state that has a law saying it is optional then more power to them. They are well aware of the outcome should they fall I am sure. That is their choice would I ride without a helmet, NO. Would I impose my beliefs on another or belittle them for chosing not to wear one NO. Seems easy enough.

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Old 08-07-2012, 08:31 AM   #33
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Joined: May 2011
From: Sunnyside Wa

I Ride: 06 636 ninja xt 600 Yam enduro, Honda v65
11 or should I say 3 At this rate we'll soon have a government regulator full time sitting in your bathroom to make sure you are wearing a helmet while sitting on the throne! As they regulate the producers out of business, or are those sitting on the throne producers, well yes. I'm fine with that as long as they keep their wages below 180,000k per year. And maybe keep their retirement under 100k. Are we Greece?

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Old 08-07-2012, 08:46 AM   #34
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Joined: Sep 2006
From: The 206

I Ride: An imaginary one
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by tatonka View Post
42 years riding , mostly without a helmut. Crossed country 3 times without one, back in the 70's lots of states didnt have them. Dont know why everyone gets so scared over it. You go as fast as comfort allows , without a helmut and no wind shield you go slow which = safer.
I lean this way. I doubt I would wear a helmet 100% of the time if we didn't have a law here.

And especially on the roads in the rest of the country, a big motorcycle tooling down a wide open road without a helmet on is a shit ton safer than some squiddly doo "railing High Bridge" in full gear.

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Old 08-07-2012, 08:53 AM   #35
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Joined: Feb 2010
From: Puyallup,WA

I Ride: 2009 street triple R
Im working in Illinois.... no helmet law here.. along with no helmet not 1 piece of gear... i dont understand but whatever
Posted via PNW Riders Mobile

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Old 08-07-2012, 08:55 AM   #36
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Joined: May 2009
From: WA
I for one am for less gov reg in our affairs. That said, how many riders have enough medical insurance to cover their hospitalization/rehab if their injured. It is kinda like seat-belts, yes there have been situations where a belt caused/added to the injuries. In most cases IMO helmets benefit a rider. I think it was 86 or so, WA repealed the helmet law for a brief period. I rode once on a sunny day thinking how much better it felt, the wind in my hair and all. About half way through the ride I started thinking how venerable I felt. Next ride, was with a helmet. Been down once, ground helmet down to the lining. Ripped right sleeve off a HD leather jacket along with glove. Ground leather pants to the point, when I attempted to stand, ass split open. PS Back then I was younger and foolishly arrogant, in thinking I was too skilled to crash. I know better now...AJ

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Old 08-07-2012, 09:10 AM   #37
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Joined: Mar 2008
From: Poulsbo, WA

I Ride: 1290 SDR, WR250X, SV650
I started riding in Wa before the helmet law was made universal.

One hot Saturday night I was riding from ID to spokanistan (no lid) with a couple of chicks I wanted to impress following me in their car. We happened upon two VFR's wadded up in the middle of the highway. We pulled over to check on everybody when some dude comes walking up to me and looking for a cigarette. Before I could answer he turned to walk away revealing that a fairly large part of his cranium was, shall we say, compromised. We sat him down, waited for the ambulance and eventually left. Me with my helmet on. The dude looking for a cigarette didn't make it.

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Old 08-07-2012, 11:07 AM   #38
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Joined: Apr 2011
From: Port Orchard, WA

I Ride: 2007 Moto Guzzi Norge, 1988 H-D (Project) Electra-Glide
The helmet discussion is always a fascinating one, always passionately debated.

Many people approach the issue from the presumed cost of unhelmeted riders. I say presumed because most of the data is skewed from the beginning of the collection process. It begins with how the query is defined; asking for the cost of all motorcycle crash victims that had any public dollars involved will yield a different data set from asking for the cost of all unhelmeted crash victims that utilized public dollars. There is further statistical subterfuge when the costs not borne by public dollars, i.e. covered by private insurance, are not factored out.

And so it goes.

Many people approach the issue from the libertarian standpoint, questioning of the role of government in the decisions of everyday citizens. How intrusive should government be in protecting the citizen from himself? Where do we set the limit?

It’s an interesting philosophical debate that gets carried out ad infinitum during every political season.

Another approach to the issue is the serviceability and usefulness of helmets, encompassing the concept of injury transference caused by the helmet and the attempt to quantify the number of people who would not die if there was a helmet law. The former carries little, if any, statistical weight, and the latter, as an attempt to prove a negative, is impossible, or as I like to call it, “statistical masturbation.”

What many people fail to address, laymen and policy makers alike, is the causality of the crashes. How do we reduce the number of crashes?

There is no such thing as “safer crashing,” but there is such a thing as safer operation.

Preaching over (for a while)

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Old 08-07-2012, 12:56 PM   #39
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Joined: Sep 2006
From: The 206

I Ride: An imaginary one
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peltzman_effect

http://hotair.com/headlines/archives...to-be-healthy/

The Peltzman effect: Why it’s hard for government to force people to be healthy
It is really very difficult to force people to live more healthily than they want. The federal government has mandated safer cars, but research has consistently shown that such mandates lead people to drive more recklessly. (See also this study from the Review of Economics and Statistics.) The number of accidents actually increases after safety features such as seat belts are mandated for cars. True, the occupants of a car are more likely to survive an individual accident, but generally the number of accidents increases by enough to offset the safety benefits. In addition, more pedestrians and bicyclists are struck by cars.

This finding also applies to NASCAR drivers. And bicyclists are more likely to get hit by cars when they wear safety helmets.

This phenomenon is so pervasive that economists have even given it a name: the Peltzman effect, after the University of Chicago economist who first discovered it in 1975.

And it hasn’t been noticed just for automobile safety and food. The effect has shown up in childproof medicine bottles, where the childproof tops result in parents’ storing medicine in places that children find easier to reach, thus offsetting the benefits of the tops.

Possibly most relevant for Mayor Bloomberg, Peltzman recently noticed the result again in research showing that even great medical breakthroughs have little long-run effect on mortality rates. One of the most significant medical breakthroughs in human history was the development of antibiotics and other anti-infective drugs. Today, people no longer face a high risk of dying from past scourges like scarlet fever or tuberculosis. But these health benefits were offset when people began taking more risks, which led to more accidents, or when they changed their diet and exercise habits.

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Old 08-07-2012, 01:59 PM   #40
Chicken Strips
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OP
 
Joined: Jun 2011
From: Lakewood, WA

I Ride: Suzuki GSXR 600, 2003 Honda CBR F4i
“ Quote:
Originally Posted by Runout View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peltzman_effect

http://hotair.com/headlines/archives...to-be-healthy/

The Peltzman effect: Why itís hard for government to force people to be healthy
It is really very difficult to force people to live more healthily than they want. The federal government has mandated safer cars, but research has consistently shown that such mandates lead people to drive more recklessly. (See also this study from the Review of Economics and Statistics.) The number of accidents actually increases after safety features such as seat belts are mandated for cars. True, the occupants of a car are more likely to survive an individual accident, but generally the number of accidents increases by enough to offset the safety benefits. In addition, more pedestrians and bicyclists are struck by cars.

This finding also applies to NASCAR drivers. And bicyclists are more likely to get hit by cars when they wear safety helmets.

This phenomenon is so pervasive that economists have even given it a name: the Peltzman effect, after the University of Chicago economist who first discovered it in 1975.

And it hasnít been noticed just for automobile safety and food. The effect has shown up in childproof medicine bottles, where the childproof tops result in parentsí storing medicine in places that children find easier to reach, thus offsetting the benefits of the tops.

Possibly most relevant for Mayor Bloomberg, Peltzman recently noticed the result again in research showing that even great medical breakthroughs have little long-run effect on mortality rates. One of the most significant medical breakthroughs in human history was the development of antibiotics and other anti-infective drugs. Today, people no longer face a high risk of dying from past scourges like scarlet fever or tuberculosis. But these health benefits were offset when people began taking more risks, which led to more accidents, or when they changed their diet and exercise habits.
I found this very interesting! Thank you for your input!

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